THE CONCEPT OF RUSSIAN ARCHITECTURE IN THE BALTIC PROVINCES BETWEEN THE GREAT NORTHERN WAR AND THE COSMOPOLITANISM OF THE 19TH CENTURY

  • Juhan Maiste
Keywords: cultural geography, Russian architecture, Baltic provinces, Italian architects, manor houses, church architecture

Abstract

The goal of this article is to examine the role of the new Russian ruling
power as it related to cultural policy in the Baltic provinces between
the Great Northern War (1700–1721) and the Russian Revolution (1917),
in order to engender a discussion about the Russian influence in
Estonia’s architectural history – its content and meaning – based on
primary sources in the archives of Estonia, St Petersburg and Moscow.
The historiography of this topic dates back nearly a century; as a
neighbouring country and an important centre of political power and
culture, the influence of St Petersburg as the main Russian metropolis
has been always been taken into consideration and studied in the
history of Estonian art history. The articles by Sergey Androsov
and Georgy Smirnov that appear in this volume have provided the
inspiration to try and re-examine the entire spectrum of Estonia’s
position between East and West, and to point out the main subjects
in this new context and the relationship to the new geography of
architecture in the Age of Enlightenment and the stylistic changes
of the 19th century.

Author Biography

Juhan Maiste

Juhan Maiste is Professor and Head of the Department of Art
History at the University of Tartu. PhD at the Moscow Central
Institute of Art history (1985), doctoral studies at the university of
Helsinki, second Doctoral degree at the Estonian Academy of Arts
(1995). The annual Baltic prize for the best scientific research (1997).
Fellow and scholarships at the universities of Stockholm, Oxford,
British Academy, and ICCROM in Rome. Visiting professor at the
universities of Helsinki, Turku, Oulu in Finland, Greifswald, La
Sapienza in Rome and others. Doctor Honoris Causa of the Latvian
Academy of Sciences. Main fields of study: classical ideal and its
reflections in the Renaissance and Neoclassicism in Northern Europe
and Baltic countries, manor architecture, the university landscape
of the Enlightenment period. He is author of several monographs
on philosophy and the poetics of art history, cultural heritage and
landscape architecture. The editor-in-chief of the Baltic Journal of
Art History. Recent publications include: series of publications on
the architectural and cultural history of Tartu University and the
architecture of Johann Wilhelm Krause (V volumes, 1999–2016),
Eesti kunsti ajalugu = History of Estonian Art, 1770–1830 (ed. by Juhan
Maiste, 2016).

Published
2019-05-15